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While associations have been found between sugar-sweetened drinks and cardiometabolic risk in adults, a recent study has aimed to investigate the cardiometabolic risk in children.

 

A recent study published in The Journal of Nutrition set out to investigate the association between sugar-sweetened drinks and cardiometabolic risk in children. Specifically, the researchers measured plasma HDL cholesterol and triglycerides in children, over a period of 12 months.

It may not be a surprising finding that greater consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks was associated with a higher total energy intake. The researchers also found that intake of sugar-sweetened drinks was associated with a lower amount of fruit and vegetable consumption, lower socioeconomic status, and increased sedentary time.

In terms of cardiometabolic risk, the study found that intake of sugar-sweetened drinks was associated with higher plasma triglycerides. This rise in triglycerides was found to increase incrementally in children who consumed 1-2, 2-7, or more than 7 sugar-sweetened drinks per week. While the study did not find an association between sugar-sweetened drink consumption and levels of HDL cholesterol over a 12 month period, HDL cholesterol was higher in children who reduced their intake of sugar-sweetened drinks by 1 or more servings per week when compared with children who did not change their intake over the 12-month study period.

 

 

Van Rompay, MI, McKeown, NM, Goodman, E, Eliasziw, M, Chomitz, VR, Gordon, CM, Economos, CD, Sacheck, JM. “Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Positively Associated with Baseline Triglyceride Concentrations, and Changes in Intake Are Inversely Associated with HDL Cholesterol Increases over 12 Months in a Multi-Ethnic Sample of Children” Journal of Nutrition First published September 2, 2015, doi: 10.3945/​jn.115.212662
 

 

 

 

Written by Deborah Tallarigo, PhD

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