organic

One of the latest trends in healthy eating is organic produce, meat, and dairy, however is the higher price of these items justified by their nutritional content?

 

A recent study headed up by researchers from Newcastle University, UK, aimed to compare between organic and non-organic meat products to see whether there really is a significant difference in nutritional composition.

The researchers reviewed all published scientific studies that have compared the composition of organic and non-organic meat products. They found that the specific make-up of the meat, in terms of types and amounts of fatty acids, varied between organic and non-organic meats. They found that organic meat contained up to 50% higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, while having lower levels of two types of saturated fats that have been associated cardiovascular disease risk.

In a corresponding study, published in the same edition of the British Journal of Nutrition, the same group of researchers report that organic milk also differs in composition between organic and non-organic forms. They reported that organic milk had a greater amount of conjugated linoleic acid (40%), iron, Vitamin E, and carotenoids. On the other hand, conventionally produced milk had higher levels of iodine and selenium.

The researchers suggest that due to results of experimental studies in animals, that the organic method of high grazing and forage-based diets, are likely the cause of differences between the compositions of meat and dairy products. However, they do suggest that further studies should investigate a larger range of nutrient composition, including antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

 

Średnicka-Tober, D, Barańsk, M, Seal, CJ, Sanderson, R, Benbrook, C, Steinshamn, H, Gromadzka-Ostrowska, J, Rembiałkowska, E, Skwarło-Sońta, K, Eyre, M, Cozzi, G, Larsen, MK, Jordon, T, Niggli, U, Sakowski, T, Calder, PC, Burdge, GC, Sotiraki, S, Stefanakis, A, Stergiadis, S, Yolcu, H, Chatzidimitriou, E, Butler, G, Stewart, G, Leifert, C. “Composition differences between organic and conventional meat: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis” British Journal of Nutrition FirstView Article

 

Średnicka-Tober, D, Barańsk, M, Seal, CJ, Sanderson, R, Benbrook, C, Steinshamn, H, Gromadzka-Ostrowska, J, Rembiałkowska, E, Skwarło-Sońta, K, Eyre, M, Cozzi, G, Larsen, MK, Jordon, T, Niggli, U, Sakowski, T, Calder, PC, Burdge, GC, Sotiraki, S, Stefanakis, A, Stergiadis, S, Yolcu, H, Chatzidimitriou, E, Butler, G, Stewart, G, Leifert, C. “Higher PUFA and n-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acid, α-tocopherol and iron, but lower iodine and selenium concentrations in organic milk: a systematic literature review and meta- and redundancy analyses” British Journal of Nutrition FirstView Article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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